INTERVIEW WITH AN ARTIST: EVA WANG




Your work sheds lights on the parts of the human psyche that most of us are resisting to face: loneliness, longing for connection, safe expression of desire, and and the same time fear of intimacy. Have you been able to overcome any of the psychological challenges that you’re portraying in your work or are you still in the process of figuring things out?

The issues addressed in my work still exist in my life. From my recent “relationship”, which is the main inspiration for the project “How connected can we be”, I began to realise even further that the key reason for my desire and failure of connection is that I am not in full control of my existence and that I rely on the “other” to feel myself. To be honest, I don’t know if I will ever be able to dominate over my own existence, but I am trying to let things be and accept the situation where I am not in control instead of trying to find an answer or definition of everything. It is extremely difficult but it still makes my life easier than holding expectations.





Speaking a bit more about the internal emptiness, or the presence of absence that is acutely visible in your video installation “How connected can we be”; what do you think is the reason for this existential emptiness for people in China in particular?

I am not sure if I can speak for people in China because it is based on my own experience. But as a Chinese growing up in China, I think living in a society that is focusing on rapid economic development, individuals’ emotional expression can be limited, which can lead to mental disconnection from their living environment. It seems to me that most Chinese people care more about their money than they do about their emotions, dreams and mental health in general; Needless to say, existential rumination is not their priority. Therefore, some Chinese who do think about self-existence may feel that it is hard to find someone to relate to, which often causes them to feel off the track of “normal” life.





You are being very honest about the fact that you take pleasure in short-term relationships, and that you hardly ever felt truly connected to anyone. Could you define your idea of the connection? And wh